Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Is Chronic Pain a Disease? My Interview with Pain Specialist, Dr. Karl Hurst-Wicker, MD


To kick off this interview, I asked Dr. Hurst-Wicker this predominant question among the scientific community,

Is Chronic Pain a Disease?

Here is what Dr. Hurst-Wicker had to say.

Pain is a symptom of some other underlying problem, much like a runny nose is a symptom of a cold or allergies. The key to solving a problem is identifying the problem and figuring out how to fix it. If we invest all our time and energies in treating only the symptom, pain, without diagnosing the cause, we risk missing the chance to fix the problem and remove the symptom. We miss the opportunity to get the patient the right treatment, right away.

People experience chronic pain for many reasons, and many patients can be treated with injections, medication, surgery, or other modalities. The tough thing for both patients and physicians is realizing that human bodies are complex organisms. We are in the process of learning and understanding this intricate machine, but we don’t have all the answers to the problems we face readily available. This means that for some patients pain could be caused by something we don’t fully understand and therefore don’t have great treatments. Eventually we will get there. But if we started saying, “Oh, the problem is just chronic pain and we need to treat only the pain,” we’d miss the opportunity to find real causes, and we would miss opportunities to develop treatments that could truly help people, instead of only masking the symptoms.

Q. How important is a history and physical?

Take chronic myofascial pain as an example. Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common cause of chronic pain. It can be the primary peripheral pain generator and at the same time, it may flare up as an indicator of other pain generator in the same area. That’s why a big part of evaluating a patient with pain is getting a good history and physical exam. 


Q. Why does pain become chronic in some people and not others?

The transition from acute to chronic pain has a variety of contributing factors. Sometimes the problem is that the underlying problem can’t be fixed, like a bad joint that can’t be replaced because the patient is too sick for surgery. In other cases, people can develop the changes to central sensitization thus perpetuating pain even after the initial problem is fixed.

Some studies indicate genetic factors play a role and may explain why some people experience chronic pain and others don’t, and other studies indicate certain pain medications could initiate the process of central sensitization.

I’m not sure we will ever develop a quick or simple way to figure out what patient will develop or experience chronic pain. There are many factors at play and I think it is too complex to determine right away. But, we continue to learn more year after year.

Q. Are there other factors that contribute to chronic pain?

MRI of amygdala and hippocampus
Stress and sleep can certainly have an effect on pain. Stress alone can change the levels of neurological hormones in our central nervous system and thus, amplify chronic pain. We discussed a study in a separate interview on centralization in fibromyalgia. In this study, they used the MRI to evaluate the size of the hippocampus in fibromyalgia patients [the region of the brain responsible for with memory and spatial navigation]. One of the things they discussed was whether the hippocampus was small due to the stress of chronic pain in fibromyalgia, or if patients maybe had higher stress levels that shrunk their hippocampus and thus got fibromyalgia. Sleep, more specifically the lack of sleep, is known to worsen pain. The restorative process of sleep allows our bodies to refresh, regenerate, and heal. So when we don’t sleep, we not only miss out on restoration, we also have a concomitant increase in both the physical and mental stress that our bodies must endure.

Patients can help themselves by being more aware of stress in their life, take time to eliminate those that they can, and find better ways to deal with the ones they must. It may mean setting aside time to take a nap in the middle of the day, or other things to care for themselves. Regular exercise has shown it reduces stress and promote better sleep habits.

Stay tuned for more answers from Dr. Hurst-Wicker about what happens when our brain perceives chronic pain as a threat.

In healing,,Celeste
"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  


Karl S. Hurst-Wicker, MD, is a board certified anesthesiologist practicing pain management at the Desert Pain Institute. He graduated from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed his residency in anesthesiology at the University of Utah.


Other contributing articles written for you:

Q&A on Chronic Pain - Health Central
The Centralization of Pain - Health Central
Myofascial Pain Syndrome - Celeste's website


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate

Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com

Learn more about Celeste’s books at her website or find links here on Celeste's  blog. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others.


All answers and blogs are based on the author's opinions and writing and are not meant to replace medical advice.  

Monday, November 14, 2016

Coming Clean on Personal Hygiene: The Luxe Bidet – Chronic Illness Blogger


"I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company. "


Little did I know when I wrote the blog on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Coming Clean on A Dirty Little Secret, that I would be writing a blog from a different perspective, one of “coming clean” on personal hygiene.  

Personal hygiene means a great deal to those of us with irritable bladder, irritable bowel or other chronic illness disorders, such as immune deficiency or inflammatory bowel disease. Those of us with bowel problems, particularly those causing bowel hypermobility or other disorders, such as vulvodynia or interstitial cystitis know how important rituals of cleanliness are to our health. Accelerated bowel movement also interferes with nutrient absorption, again putting us at risk for infection.

For me, an irritable bowel attack leaves my bottom side raw and sore, breaking down my first line of defense, skin. The attack itself is very painful and the consequences are uncomfortable to say the least. Having interstitial cystitis and having IBS increases the risk of bacterial going where it should not causing frequent urinary tract infections. Personal hygiene is a priority to minimizing a great deal of collateral damage and pain from IBS.

Why is a bidet a good choice?

The Luxe Bidet (Neo 185) negates excessive wiping of watery stools that have high concentrations of digestive chemicals from the small bowel. Every boxcar of this runaway train is packed with juices that when moved into other portions of the bowel cause cramping, contracting, and spastic bowel function during an irritable bowel or inflammatory bowel attack. They are rapidly delivered to areas they should not be. While these important digestive chemicals are integral to digestion in their own portion of the digestive track, they can wreak havoc when they are rapidly moved from the small bowel into the large bowel during a painful episode. The damage doesn't end with the attack, these chemicals also irritate and breakdown sensitive tissue around the rectum and other surrounding structures. We know that stinging pain and we know this opens us up to skin infection from bacteria and candida.

Having the Luxe Bidet Neo 185 not only makes things more comfortable and clean, it gives me peace of mind when everything else is out of control.

How does the bidet work?

The Luxe Bidet Neo 185 is a dual nozzle, fresh water, non-electric mechanical bidet attachment for the commode with one-touch pressure control. It has a guard gate,  a regular nozzle and feminine wash nozzle for rear wash and a more gentle frontal wash. The nozzles drop down and retract when it’s not being used. And, it cleans itself!

The stream of water is adjustable. I feel clean without having to take a shower. I don’t have to worry about getting a yeast infection from using too many wipes, and I no longer have to worry about lurking contaminants staying behind to wreak havoc later. And it’s affordable.  

Installation

Adding the bidet to your commode doesn’t require plumbing skills. It comes with everything you need for a do-it-yourself installation. The only extra things you need is a screwdriver and a wrench. And, there are installation Instructions you can download.  Generally, it should only take about 20 minutes. It took my husband a bit longer, but we are older and it took a bit to get the connection loose at the water supply.

You can learn more about the Neo 185 at Luxebidet.com.

In healing,,Celeste


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  

~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate

Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com

Learn more about Celeste’s books at her website or find links here on Celeste's  blog. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others.


All answers and blogs are based on the author's opinions and writing and are not meant to replace medical advice.  

Monday, October 17, 2016

CELESTE SPEAKS - An autumn overview


The fall season is a time of harvest and preparation, and that is the metaphor for “Fall Devotions”. It is not a book of daily religious devotions; instead, it is a book for taking one day at a time, learning to live in the moment. As leaves turn brilliant colors and fall from the trees to provide a protective blanket for the harshness of winter, so does this book help our readers view life through a door open to a landscape of honor and hope.  (Excerpt from http://www.celestecooper.com/fall-devotions.html )

As we prepare for the days ahead, I thought it would be a good time to share a sampling of topics I have covered as free lance writer at Health Central and ProHealth. A few of the articles are listed below in alphabetical order according to the main topic. You can find more articles and direct links on my website.

Check out Celeste's articles for articles on topics, such as:

What is Centralized Pain: An Interview Dr. Karl Hurst-Wicker, MD
Chronic Pain and Movement Motivation
Illusive Disorder-Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
Dry Eye and Chronic Pain
The Connection Between TMJ and Chronic Pain
How to Report Foot Pain Symptoms
Tips for Managing Fibrofog
Fibromyalgia Awareness and Aggravating Conditions
Fast Facts: Fibromyalgia Is Real
Fibromyalgia Centralization and Peripheral Myofascial Pain
Fibromyalgia Concerns for a Healthy Mouth
A Nervous System at Odds: Dysautonomia and Fibromyalgia
Taking up the Slack: Flares, Frets and Fibro
Are There Objective Tests for Fibromyalgia?
Fibromyalgia Tender Points or Myofascial Trigger Questions
Essential Factors for Relating Fibromyalgia Symptoms
When Fibromyalgia Is More than Pain                                                    
Treatment of Foot Pain: How to Care for Our Feet
Joint Hypermobility and Chronic Pain
Downloading a Pain Tracking App
The Legs of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain
Marijuana and Chronic Pain-QA-Dr David Barton
Migraine, Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS
Myofascial Pain Treatment
What is a Myofascial Trigger Point, and Their Relationship to Pain?
Why knowing the cause of pelvic pain is essential to treatment
Piriformis Syndrome or Sciatica, Is There a Difference?
Pitfalls & Pearls-Resistance Training - fibromyalgia and myofascial pain
Restless Leg Syndrome: Sleep, Fibromyalgia, and Myofascial Pain Syndrome 
6 Reasons Why Trigger Point Injections Aren’t Helping Your Fibromyalgia
What’s Causing This Chronic Rib Pain?
Sculpting Our Thoughts on Pain
The Romance of Fibromyalgia with Tai Chi
Yoga and Chronic Pain
and more...

Articles from Celeste at CelesteCooper.com list just updated. See what’s new at:

Be sure to check out the archives here on the blog, too.

In healing,,Celeste


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  

~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate

Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com

Learn more about Celeste’s books at her website or find links here on Celeste's  blog. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others.


All answers and blogs are based on the author's opinions and writing and are not meant to replace medical advice.  

Thursday, October 6, 2016

The Patient’s Playbook: Find the “No Mistake Zone” – A Chronic Illness Blogger’s Review


"I have been given this product as part of a product review through the  Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company. "

As a retired registered nurse, educator, and author of self-help books for my fellow pain warriors, I am thrilled to say that fellow author, Leslie D. Michelson, has done the patient community a great service by giving us “The Patient’s Playbook: How to Save Your Life and the Lives of Those You Love”.


Aesthetically appealing, easy to understand attorney, Leslie Michelson, expresses relatable accounts of patient experiences, bringing it home to us as readers and patients. Using his 30 plus years of experience in the healthcare arena, he gives us “what to do’s” for nearly all healthcare decisions. We find tips for finding confidence and courage; asking questions; choosing the right doctor; working through the logistics of access, insurance, and cost; exercising patient rights; developing a support team; carrying your entire health history with you; utilizing resources, and much more.

The patient stories allow us to make objective assessments and catalog them in the file of “things to remember before, or when, it happens to me”, because in today’s fragmented and rushed healthcare environment bad things can happen. As the author suggests, hasty judgments, whether from the provider or the patient, increase the likelihood of mistakes, complications, unnecessary interventions, inappropriate referrals and other unwarranted occurrences.

I recently experienced the fall out of hastened, fragmented care. My rheumatologist became my advocate and ordered the blood tests I felt my symptoms warranted, despite the new endocrinologist telling me my symptoms couldn’t be explained by my “numbers” and to discuss my symptoms with another doctor. When my results came in, my thyroid levels had swung from critical high to critical low in 7 weeks. Because of stories like mine, finding a doctor who is a skilled diagnostician who listens and cares about patients getting the care they need is imperative. Leslie Michelson has the information you need to make that happen.  

I love this subheading in chapter six, “Forgetting Who’s in Charge. (Hint: It’s You.)”

Every patient is vulnerable when illness strikes, despite the nature or urgency. As a nurse who cared for people in the emergency department, I know patients and family members are at their lowest point, they feel they have lost all control and their duress interferes with their ability to think logically. Often, the nurse or doctor must lead the patient or family member to give them the information they need. But, this doesn’t always happen. The Patient’s Playbook gives us what we need to be in command, whether it’s finding a new doctor or being hospitalized. It teaches us to be assertive, tolerant, proactive, and partners in our care.

Lastly, a good self-help book gives us, the reader, the ability to interact with the material on a personal basis. The chapter summaries, “Quick Guides”, allow us to swiftly review areas of the book that provide information we need under certain circumstances. Even if you aren’t sick—right now—you can use the information found in The Patient’s Playbook to advocate for those you care about.

“By the time you finish reading this book, you will have completely rethought the way you interact with caregivers and hospitals.” ~ Leslie D. Michelson


Leslie Michelson, J.D., “healthcare quarterback”, CEO of Private Health Management, says his book is “A call to action to change the way we manage our health”, and that is certainly motivation enough to read it. Please take a minute and visit ThePatientsPlayBook.com, “Look Inside the Book” at Amazon and check out the “Table of Contents”, “Read a Sample” at Barnes and Nobel.   The paperback will be released on Oct. 18.  Amazon

You can also find Leslie on Facebook at Leslie Michelson @PatientsPlaybook.


In healing,,Celeste


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  

~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate


Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Axon Therapeutic Eyewear for Migraine and Blepharospam: Celeste’s Chronic Illness Blogger Review


"I have been given this product as part of a product review through the  Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company. "

According to the International Headache Society on beta 3 of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, migraine disease has many sub-types. But regardless of the type, many of us experience photophobia. A study published in the peer review journal, Cephalalgia, says approximately 80% of migraineurs experience light sensitivity during an attack. It is also estimated that up to 80% of people with blepharospasm, a facial movement disorder defined by eyelid twitching, experience the phenomenon due to bright light exposure. I happen to be in both groups. That’s why I was so excited to review “Axonoptics Therapeutic Eyewear”.

Studies show filtering out particular light rays contributing to photosensitivity reduces the number of migraines we experience. This is particularly important because these glasses are not the same as sunglasses, which I have used to help my photophobia. Axon glasses are different; they are therapeutic. 

When I first started wearing them, my usual squinting (even with sunglasses) stopped. During a migraine, the glasses really help too. Minimizing photophobia for me also means minimizing nausea and vomiting. I no longer worry about attending a conference or advocacy meeting in fear of the overhead lights triggering a migraine.

The glasses arrived in a handsome box, and a well-designed durable case.  

You can get other frames, send in your own, and get the lenses in your prescription. The frames I got are the Axon Optics JURA - Migraine Glasses for Migraine Relief and Light Sensitivity Relief. They are a stylish, classic, lightweight, unisex style spring frame, meaning they will hug your face without causing undue pressure. I must admit, the universal size scared me a bit at first, but the glasses fit my face with comfort. I hardly know there.

According to Axontherapeutics there are certain things to be considered, which I read before doing this review.

  • They can be used every day.
  • While the rose tint is not dark, which I love, they are not endorsed for night driving as a safety concern, and no research has been done to know if it would help.
  • These lenses are indicated for migraine, light sensitivity, photophobia, blepharospasm, glare, eyestrain or irritation, headaches and traumatic brain injury.
  • There are no limitations on how often they are worn.
  • The FL-41 lenses have a premium coating that is anti-smudge, anti-moisture, and anti-scratch and block 100% UVA and UVB rays.
  • The lenses I got are ideal for when using electronics, such as a computer or television, and protect against flickering or irritating light patterns. They are not indicated for outside because they aren’t dark (they do filter UV rays), but I find dark lenses give me eye strain and intensify my dry eye, so for me they are good for both inside and out, but if you need a dark lens, they also have outdoor lens for use as sunglasses.  

For me, it doesn’t matter if the sun is shining brightly or the sky is thick with clouds, I am sensitive, so even though I got the indoor tint, I also wear them when driving and enjoy knowing my eyes are protected from UV light rays, which can damage anyone's eyes. You might prefer a darker tint for sunglasses, but regardless of your preference, it is reassuring to know that photosensitivity  can now be minimized.


As migraineurs, we seek whatever means available to prevent and treat this horrific disease. And, I am happy to report these glasses are reducing blepharospasm, bringing relief from the incessant distraction of twitching eyelids. 

In healing,,Celeste


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  

~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate


Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Rolfing® and Chronic Pain: An Update from Expert, Ann M. Matney


September is “Pain Awareness Month”, so I couldn’t think of a better time to share this most important update, or unofficial addendum, to our Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain book.


Expert at the Rolfing Institute, Ann M. Matney, was kind enough to let me know the nitty gritty. Following is what she shared.

As human beings going through life, we develop postural and movement patterns that deeply inform who we are.  From physical ease to chronic pain at varying levels, how we inhabit our bodies creates the background of our immediate experience.  My passion is to guide clients through the Rolfing® ten-series, which allows them to explore posture and movement with new awareness and often releases them from limiting patterns that cause pain and discomfort. 

I am a certified Rolfer® in Bozeman, MT and I’ve been practicing for 14 years.  I want to thank you for writing Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection, an accessible, informative book that opens the doors to the world of integrative medicine as treatment for these difficult conditions. 

I found the section on Rolfing® Structural Integration to be well-written and accurate, picking up on many of the subtleties that are often glossed over or misunderstood.  So, I thank you for your careful assessment.

What is Rolfing?

One of the main issues that the Rolf Institute of Structural Integration seeks to clarify in the press is that, despite the use of a physical contact that is comparable to “myofascial release”, structural integration is not a form of massage. Rolfing/Structural Integration is a separate lineage with its own history, as well as its own schools and separate continuing education.  One cannot learn massage at a “Structural Integration (SI)” school, nor properly learn SI at a massage school.  In fact, “myofascial release” and “deep tissue massage” are offshoots of Rolfing.  

The Difference between Rolfing and Massage

An important distinction between Rolfing and myofascial release is that Rolfing strategically lengthens fascia that is shortened, while avoiding lengthening fascia that is relatively long, so that the person achieves maximal balance between agonist/antagonist muscle pairs as well as creating more balance at each joint.  

Rolfing also includes postural and movement re-education for sitting, standing, walking, and so forth, so that the client can consciously integrates new postural and movement balance. I say all this as a means of explanation for why we decline to have structural integration referred to as massage.

Is Rolfing Painful?

Clients with fibromyalgia and other chronic pain disorders need not be fearful that Rolfing is “aggressive”.  When the practitioner has a patient-focused approach, it may be used successfully because current structural integration training and practice is intentionally neither aggressive nor painful. While there was a belief that more intensity yielded more results when Rolfing was first emerging as a bodywork, that thinking has been extinguished for decades at both institutional and individual levels.   

Complements to Rolfing

Craniosacral therapy and neurofeedback can reduce anxiety and lift depression, allowing clients to experience a sense of peacefulness and integration that compliments Rolfing. I help clients inhabit their physical selves in a new and deeper way so that comfort and integration can become their new normal.  

Ann M. Matney has a B.A. in philosophy from Smith College, is a certified Rolfer® by the Rolf Institute of Structural Integration, and she is trained in craniosacral therapy and neurofeedback.  She is currently enrolled as a graduate student in a rehabilitation counseling at Montana State University.

Footnote

Annie tells me the International Association of Structural Integrators sets the standards for structural integrators. Rolfers® (which should be capitalized every time and followed by the registered trademark symbol for the first occurrence) are one group, namely those certified by the Rolf Institute of Structural Integration in Boulder, CO.


In healing,,Celeste


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  

~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate


Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com

Sunday, September 18, 2016

THE PATIENT’S PLAYBOOK: HOW TO SAVE YOUR LIFE AND THE LIVES OF THOSE YOU LOVE – Celeste’s Book Review


"I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company. "

As a retired registered nurse, educator, and author of self-help books for my fellow pain warriors, I am thrilled to say that fellow author, Leslie D. Michelson, has done the patient community a great service by giving us “The Patient’s Playbook: How to Save Your Life and the Lives of Those You Love”.

This book is aesthetically appealing, easy to use, and the author expresses relatable accounts of patient experiences. There are “what to do’s” for nearly all healthcare decisions. You will find tips for finding confidence and courage; asking questions; finding the right doctor; working through the logistics of access, insurance, and cost; exercising patient rights; developing a support team; carrying your entire health history with you; utilizing resources, and much more.

Patient stories allow us to make objective assessments and catalog them in the file of “things to remember before, or when, it happens to me”, because in today’s fragmented and rushed healthcare environment bad things can happen. As the author suggests, hasty judgments, whether from the provider or the patient, increase the likelihood of mistakes, complications, unnecessary interventions, inappropriate referrals and other unwarranted occurrences.

I recently experienced the fall out of hastened, fragmented care. My rheumatologist became my advocate and ordered the blood tests I felt my symptoms warranted, despite the new endocrinologist telling me my symptoms couldn’t be explained by my “numbers” and to discuss my symptoms with another doctor. When my results came in, my thyroid levels had swung from critical high to critical low in 7 weeks. Because of stories like mine, finding a doctor who is a skilled diagnostician who listens and cares about patients getting the care they need is imperative. Leslie Michelson has the information you need to make that happen.  

I love this subheading in chapter six, “Forgetting Who’s in Charge. (Hint: It’s You.)”

Every patient is vulnerable when illness strikes, despite the nature or urgency. As a nurse who cared for people in the emergency department, I know patients and family members are at their lowest point, they feel they have lost all control and their duress interferes with their ability to think logically. Often, the nurse or doctor must lead the patient or family member to give them the information they need. But, this doesn’t always happen. The Patient’s Playbook gives us what we need to be in command, whether it’s finding a new doctor or being hospitalized. It teaches us to be assertive, tolerant, proactive, and partners in our care.

Lastly, a good self-help book gives the reader/learner the ability to interact with the material on a personal basis. The chapter summaries, “Quick Guides”, allow us to swiftly review areas of the book that provide information we need under certain circumstances. Even if you aren’t sick—right now—you can use the information found in The Patient’s Playbook to advocate for those you care about.

“By the time you finish reading this book, you will have completely rethought the way you interact with caregivers and hospitals.” ~ Leslie D. Michelson


Leslie Michelson, J.D., “healthcare quarterback”, CEO of Private Health Management, says his book is “A call to action to change the way we manage our health”, and that is certainly motivation enough to read it. Please take a minute and visit ThePatientsPlayBook.com, “Look Inside the Book” at Amazon and check out the “Table of Contents”, “Read a Sample” at Barnes and Nobel.   The paperback will be released on Oct. 18.  Amazon

You can also find him on Facebook at Leslie Michelson @PatientsPlaybook.


Sunday, September 11, 2016

Ravyn’s Doll: How to Explain Fibromyalgia to Your Child by Melissa


The author of Ravyn’s Doll: How to Explain Fibromyalgia to Your Child, Melissa Swanson, has been a close friend. We met on-line through our endeavors to raise awareness for fibromyalgia. It’s true that I mentored her by sharing my knowledge as an author and advocate, but she has taken that information far beyond my wildest expectations. And now, we share even more as published authors.

I had the distinct pleasure of unveiling my signed copy of Ravyn’s Doll with a mutual dear friend, Cindy Leyland. Melissa shares our friendship with Cindy as a fellow Leader Against Pain, and me as a participant in the citizens leadership group, PAINS-KC. I do not believe it is by chance that people come together across the miles when they share core values.  

Following is my review. My eyes are welling with tears of appreciation that Melissa would include it in her book.


“Fibromyalgia is difficult to live with, but we often forget how it affects those around us. This children's book means something to anyone who reads it. Even physicians can learn what it is like for the family. Who among us can resist the innocence of a child? Ravyn's Doll gives an honest account of fibromyalgia in a helpful and meaningful way, which is so important to a child's understanding. I find this treasure a must read for any family whose member has a chronic, invisible illness. “

(Available by clicking here.)


I hope you will share this extraordinary book with those you love. 

You can read more about Melissa in my two part interview with her. Melissa Swanson: A Rite of Passage with Fibromyalgia  and Melissa Swanson Interview: An Advocate’s Journey Cont’d.
 

In healing,,Celeste
.


~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  

~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Freelance Writer at Health Central & ProHealth Advocate

Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com

Learn more about Celeste’s books at her website or find links here on Celeste's  blog. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others.

All answers and blogs are based on the author's opinions and writing and are not meant to replace medical advice.  

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Inspiration for Reclaiming Control over Pain and Illness


A Beholding Forest©




A respite in the Rockies is something my husband and I have enjoyed for thirty-five years and since we are in our sixth and seventh decades of life, we are grateful to have done it yet again. It’s a marriage retreat of sorts, a time to appreciate my husband’s hard work, allowing me to use my photography to escape into the bowels of majesty.


I feel an intimacy with nature, wild flowers coloring the landscape, wild animals outside our RV door, rainbows that astound us and pink sunsets that devour our sensibilities. I am touched by my husband’s desire to find joy in something I love. My soul is awakened when I hear these words…


Come quick; grab your camera!

Young Buck Innocence©

Early fall makes itself known in the mountains where summer is short. The aspen’s are beginning to turn and as their  leaves shudder to meet the sun’s rays, I am reminded that the warm days of summer will soon give way to crisp chilly air that awakens the season of harvest and preparation.

Chronic pain and illness dictates that we adapt to change. But, unlike nature’s beings, it isn’t always instinctive. I know I need daily reminders on how to apply the things I learned when writing our first book  (with contributions of my co-author, Jeff Miller, PhD).

Fall is looming and change is upon us. Find out how you can adapt as nature does by using the daily tips in the Fall Devotions edition of the book series. If you already have the book, it's time to get it out and re-explore. I suspect you will see things from a different perspective this year, and you will learn something new to share.

Find detailed information at CelesteCooper.com:  


  
September is pain awareness month and a busy one for those of us who advocate for balanced affordable care for everyone. My greatest desire as an RN is for patients to have choices. It’s empowering to reclaim control over the thing we can change, and I hope you find Fall Devotions helps you do that.

Here’s to a colorful and hearty fall season.



Available:

Amazon in paperback 
Amazon UK Kindle 
Amazon Canada Kindle 
Barnes and Nobel paperback 




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"Adversity is only an obstacle if we fail to see opportunity."  
Celeste Cooper, RN
Author—Patient—Health Central Chronic Pain Pro Advocate

Celeste’s Website: http://CelesteCooper.com


Learn more about what you can do to help your body function to its potential in the books you can find here on Celeste's  blog. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others.


All answers and blogs are based on the author's opinions and writing and are not meant to replace medical advice.  

Celeste's Website

Celeste's Website
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